Halloween Candy

October 5, 2009Devon 2 Comments »

Halloween Candy at WalmartWell, it must be almost Halloween in this material world of ours. I was at Walmart the other day (yes, Devon went to Walmart, pick up your lower jaw) and found the aisle of Halloween candy. You read right, aisle of candy. You have to understand, it does not come through well in the photo, this is about 80 feet (160 feet if you include both sides) of candy — CANDY. This aisle is in addition to the normal (non-Halloween) aisle of candy. The best part, no prices are listed. And we all know it’s proven that you buy more when no prices are listed — I don’t know if that is true or not, but it probably is.

CandyNow think about this. As of July 2009, there were 883 Walmart stores in the USA. If every Walmart in the USA has this aisle of candy, how much candy is that? My other question is, what happens to the candy this is not purchased? I know some will go on clearance and get gobbled up (pun intended), but what about the stuff that isn’t. Does it go back to the manufacture, get repackaged, and they try again? Is it resold next Halloween? Does it go to the dump? Or does it somehow magically end up in little-old-ladies’ handbags?

Here are some fun facts I found online from my research. Austin, Charlotte, and San Antonio lead USA Halloween spending on candy and decorations, with $53 per household. Only 26% of homes gives out full-sized candy bars — those that do are usually the “Ah, rich people… probably make [you] drink cider and bob for apples” (props to you if you know what movie this quote is from). Prohibition was a sweet age of revenge: Baby Ruths, Oh Henry!, Charleston Chew, Mounds, Milky Way, Reese’s peanut butter cups, Bit-O-Honey, Mr Goodbar, Milk Duds, Butterfinger, and Snickers all debuted between 1920 and 1930. The average person will spend around $20 on Halloween candy this year. I ate Twizzlers while writing this blog.

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